How Big is Big? Oracle’s Largest Data Warehouses

I found this post, entitled Some of Oracle’s Largest Warehouses, on the DBMS2 blog and I thought I’d re-sort them by size in descending order. So, here they are:

Quoting Curt:

10 databases total are listed with >16 TB, which is fairly consistent with Larry Ellison’s confession during the Exadata announcement that Oracle has trouble over 10 TB, which is something I’ve gotten a lot of flack from a few Oracle partisans for pointing out

While I know it’s a bit unfair to compare contentbases with databases (because content is generally so much bigger and there is so much more of it), I thought I’d point out that the largest MarkLogic production application today runs at over 100 TB and that a typical publisher has single-digit terabytes of content. And we’re just getting started. And we’re not storing lots of stuff redundantly to optimize performance as you would in a data warehouse.

4 responses to “How Big is Big? Oracle’s Largest Data Warehouses

  1. should fix that broken link to mark logic products.

  2. done. thanks. (they changed the URLs on me.)

  3. Dave,Isn’t it a little bit of apples to oranges. I mean, 10 TB of credit card tx data is a boatload of data — all of which is probably relevant and searchable. Managing lots and lots of little kids *seems* a bit harder than managing a couple of big kids.\jm

  4. Not sure I’m following you on the kids analogy but I do agree (and I mentioned in the post!) that I think it’s a bit unfair to compare databases and contentbases. But I’d argue that managing 100 TB contentbase is *harder* than a 100 TB database because of all the vagaries associated with content — and empirically because virtually no one (save for Google and a few MarkLogic customers) actually attempt to create and manage contentases at this scale.Net/net: I do think they’re different but not so much so as to make comparison meaningless.

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