Category Archives: Management

Do You Want to be Judged on Intentions or Results?

It was early in my career, maybe 8 years in, and I was director of product marketing at a startup.  One day, my peer, the directof of marketing programs hit me with this in an ops review meeting:

You want to be judged on intentions, not results.

I recall being dumbfounded at the time.  Holy cow, I thought.  Is he right?  Am I standing up arguing about mitigating factors and how things might have been when all the other people in the room were thinking only about black-and-white results?

It was one of those rare phrases that really stuck with me because, among other reasons, he was so right.  I wasn’t debating whether things happened or not.  I wasn’t making excuses or being defensive.  But I was very much judging our performance in the theoretical, hermetically sealed context of what might have been.

Kind of like sales saying a deal slipped instead of did not close.   Or marketing saying we got all the MQLs but didn’t get the requisite pipeline.  Or alliances saying that we signed up the 4 new partners, but didn’t get the new opportunities that were supposed to come with them.

Which phrase of the following sentence matters more — the first part or the second?

We did what we were supposed to, but it didn’t have the desired effect.

We would have gotten the 30 MQLS from the event if it hadn’t snowed in Boston.  But who decided to tempt fate by doing a live event in Boston in February?  People who want to be judged on intentions think about the snowstorm; people who want to be judged on results think about the MQLs.

People who want to judged on intentions build in what they see as “reasons” (which others typically see as “excuses”) for results not being achieved.

I’m six months late hiring the PR manager, but that’s because it’s hard to find great PR people right now.  (And you don’t want me to hire a bad one, do you?)

No, I don’t want you to hire a bad one.  I want you to hire a great one and I wanted you to hire them 6 months ago.  Do you think every other PR manager search in the valley took 6 months more than plan?  I don’t.

Fine lines exist here, no doubt.  Sometimes reasons are reasons and sometimes they are actually excuses.  The question isn’t about any one case.  It’s about, deep down, are you judging yourself by intentions or results?

You’d be surprised how many otherwise very solid people get this one thing wrong — and end up career-limited as a result.

The Role of Professional Services in a SaaS Business

I love to create reductionist mission statements for various departments in a company.  These are designed to be ultra-compact and potentially provocative.  My two favorite examples thus far:

I like to make them based on real-life situations, e.g., when someone running a department seems confused about the real purpose of their team.

For example, some police-oriented HR departments seem to think their mission is protect employees from management.  Think: “Freeze, you can’t send an email like that; put your hands in the air and step away from the keyboard!”

I think otherwise. If the HR team conceptualizes itself as “helping managers manage,” it will be more positively focused, help deliver better results, and be a better business partner — all while protecting employees from bad managers (after all, mistreating employees is bad management).

Over the past year, I’ve developed one of these pithy mission statements for professional services, also known as consulting, the (typically billable) experts employed by a software company who work with customers on implementations after the sale:

Professsional services exists to maximize ARR while not losing money.

Maximizing ARR surprises some people.  Why say that in the context of professional services?  Sales brings in new ARR.  Customer Success (or Customers for Life) is reponsible for the maintenance and expansion of existing ARR.  Where does professional services fit in?  Shouldn’t they exist to drive successful implementations or to achieve services revenue targets?  Yes, but that’s actually secondary to the primary mission.

The point of a SaaS business is to maxmize enterprise value and that value is a function of ARR.  If you could maximize ARR without a professional services team then you wouldn’t have one at all (and some SaaS firms don’t).  But if you’re going to have a professional services team, then they — like everybody else — should be there to maximize ARR.  How does professional services help maximize ARR?  They:

  • Help drive new ARR by supporting sales — for example, working with sales to draft a statement of work and by building confidence that the company can solve the customer’s problem.  If you remember that customers buy “holes, not bits” you’ll know that a SaaS subscription, by itself, doesn’t solve any business problem.  The importance of the consultants who do the solution mapping is paramount.
  • Help preserve/expand existing ARR by supporting the Customer Success (aka, the Customers for Life) team, either by repairing blown implementations or by doing new or expanded implementations at existing customers.  This could entail anything from a “save” to a simple expansion, but either way, professional services is there maximizing ARR.
  • Help do both by enabling the partner ecosystem.  Professional services is key to enabling partners who can both provide quality implementation services for customers and who can extend the vendor’s reach through go-to-market partnering.

Or, as our SVP of Services at Host Analytics says, “our role is to make happy customers.”

I prefer to say “maximize ARR without losing money” but we’re very much on the same page.  Let’s finish with the “not losing money” part.  In my opinion,

  • A typical on-premises software vendor drove 25% to 30% gross margins on professional services.  Those were the days one big one-shot license fees and huge multi-million dollar implementations.  In those days, customers weren’t necessarily too happy but the services team had a strong “make money” aspect to its mission.
  • A typical SaaS vendors have negative 20% to negative 10% gross margins on services (and sometimes a lot more negative than that).  That’s because some vendors subsidize their ARR with free or heavily discounted services because ARR recurs whereas services revenue does not.

I believe that professional services has real value (e.g., our team at Host Analytics is amazing) and that if you’re driving 0% to 5% gross margins with such a team that you are already supporting the ARR pool with discounted services (you could be running 25% to 30% margins).  Whether you make 0% or 10% doesn’t much matter — because it won’t to someone valuing your company — but I think it’s a mistake to shoot for the 30% margins of yore as well as a mistake to tolerate -50% margins and completely de-value your services.

10 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Moving into Management

I went looking for a post to help someone decide if they should move into management, but couldn’t find one that I really loved.  These three posts aren’t bad.  Nor is this HBR article.  But since I couldn’t find a post that I thought nails the spirit of the question, I thought I’d write one myself.

So here are the ten questions you should consider before making a move into management.

 1. Do you genuinely care about people?  

Far and away this is the most important question because management is all about people.  If you don’t enjoy working with people, if you don’t enjoy helping people, or if you’d prefer to be left alone to work on tasks or projects, then do not go into management.  If you do not genuinely care about people, then do not go into management.

2. Are you organized?

While a small number of organizational leaders and founders can get away with being unstructured and disorganized, the rest of us in management need to be organized.  If you are naturally disorganized, management will be hard for you — and the people who work for you — because your job is to make the plan and coordinate work on it.

This is why one of my managment interview questions is:  “if I opened up your kitchen cabinets what would I see?”

3.  Are you willing to continuously overcommunicate?

In a world filled with information pollution, constant distractions, and employees who think that they can pay continuous partial attention, you’d be amazed how clearly you need to state things and how often you need to repeat them in order to minimize confusion.  A big part of management is communication, so if you don’t like communicating, aren’t good at it, or don’t relish the idea of deliberately and continuously overcommunicating, then don’t go into management.

4.  Can you say “No” when you need to do?

Everybody loves yes-people managers except, of course, the people who work for them.  While saying yes to the boss and internal customers feels good, you will run your team ragged if you lack the backbone to say no when you need to.  If you can’t say no to a bad idea or offer up reprioritization options when the team is red-lining, then don’t go into management.  Saying no is an important part of the job.

5. Are you conflict averse?

Several decades I read the book Tough-Minded Management:  A Guide for Managers Too Nice for Their Own Good, and it taught me the importance of toughness in management.  Management is a tough job.  You need to layout objectives and hold people accountable for achieving them.  You need to hold peers accountable for delivering on dependencies.  You need to give people feedback that they may not want to hear.  If you’re conflict averse and loathe the idea of doing these things, don’t go into management.  Sadly, conflict averse managers actually generate far more conflict than then non-conflict-averse peers.

6. Do you care more about being liked than being effective?

If you are someone who desperately needs to be liked, then don’t go into management.  Managers need to focus on effectiveness.  The best way to be liked in management is to not care about being liked.  Employees want to be on a winning team that is managed fairly and drives results.  Focus on that and your team will like you.  If you focus on being liked and want to be everyone’s buddy, you will fail as both buddy and manager.

7. Are you willing to let go?  

Everybody knows a micromanager who can’t let go.  Nobody likes working for one.  Good managers aim to specify what needs to be done without detailing precisely how to do it.  Bad managers either over-specify or simply jump in and do it themselves.  This causes two problems:  they anger the employee whose job it was to perform the task and they abdicate their responsibility to manage the team.  If the manager’s doing the employee’s job then whose doing the manager’s?  All too often, no one.

8.  Do you have thick skin?

Managers make mistakes and managers get criticized.  If you can’t handle either, then don’t go into management.  Put differently, how many times in your career have your run into your boss’s office and said, “I just want to thank you for the wonderful job you do managing me.”  For me, that answer is zero.  (I have,  however, years later thanked past managers for putting up with my flaws.)

People generally don’t complement their managers; they criticize them.  You probably have criticized most of yours.  Don’t expect things to be any different once you become the manager.

9.  Do you enjoy teaching and coaching?

A huge positive of management is the joy you get from helping people develop their skills and advance in their careers.  That joy results from your investment in them with teaching and coaching.  Great employees want to be mentored.  If you don’t enjoy teaching and coaching, you’ll be cheating your employees out of learning opportunities and cheating yourself out of a valuable part of the management experience.

10.  Are you willing to lead?

Managers need not just to manage, but to lead.  If stepping up, definining a plan, proposing a solution, or taking an unpopular position scares you, well, part of that is normal, but if you’re not willing to do it anyway, then don’t go into management.  Management requires the courage to lead.  Remember the Peter Drucker quote that differentiates leadership and management.

“Management is doing things right, leadership is doing the right things.”

As a good manager, you’ll need to do both.

The Evolution of Marketing Thanks to SaaS

I was talking with my friend Tracy Eiler, author of Aligned to Achieve, the other day and she showed me a chart that they were using at InsideView to segment customers.  The chart was a quadrant that mapped customers on two dimensions:  renewal rate and retention rate.  The idea was to use the chart to plot customers and then identify patterns (e.g., industries) so marketing could identify the best overall customers in terms of lifetime value as the mechanism for deciding marketing segmentation and targeting.

Here’s what it looked like:

saas-strategic-value

While I think it’s a great chart, what really struck me was the thinking behind it and how that thinking reflects a dramatic evolution in the role of marketing across my career.

  • Back two decades ago when marketing was measured by leads, they focused on how to cost-effectively generate leads, looking at response rates for various campaigns.
  • Back a decade ago when marketing was measured by opportunities (or pipeline), they focused on how to cost-effectively generate opportunities, looking at response and opportunity conversion rates.
  • Today, as more and more marketers are measured by marketing-sourced New ARR, they are focused on cost-effectively generating not just opportunities, but opportunities-that-close, looking all the way through the funnel to close rates.
  • Tomorrow, as more marketers will be measured on the health of the overall ARR pool, they will be focused on cost-effectively generating not just opportunities-that-close but opportunities that turn into the best long-term customers. (This quadrant helps you do just that.)

As a company makes this progression, marketing becomes increasingly strategic, evolving in mentality with each step.

  • Starting with, “what sign will attract the most people?” (Including “Free Beer Here” which has been used at more than one conference.)
  • To “what messages aimed at which targets will attract the kind of people who end up evaluating?”
  • To “who are we really looking to sell to — which people end up buying the most and the most easily – and what messages aimed at which targets will attract them?”
  • To “what are the characteristics of our most successful customers and how can we find more people like them?”

The whole pattern reminds me of the famous Hubspot story where the marketing team was a key part forcing the company to focus on either “Owner Ollie” (the owner of a <10 person business) or “Manager Mary” (a marketer at a 10 to 1000 person business).  For years they had been serving both masters poorly and by focusing on Manager Mary they were able to drive a huge increase in their numbers that enabled cost-effectively scaling the business and propelling them onto a successful IPO.

hubspot

What kind of CMO does any CEO want on their team?  That kind.  The kind worried about the whole business and looking at it holistically and analytically.

In-Memory Analytics: The Other Kind – A Key Success Factor for Your Career

I’m not going to talk about columnar databases, compression, horizontal partitioning, SAP Hana, or real-time vs. pre-aggregated summarization in this post on in-memory analytics.  I’m going to talk about the other kind of in-memory analytics.  The kind that can make or break your career.

What do you mean, the other kind of in-memory analytics?  Quite simply, the kind you keep in your head (i.e., in human memory).  Or, better put, the kind you should be expected to keep in your head and be able to recite on demand in any business meeting.

I remember when I worked at Salesforce, I covered for my boss a few times at the executive staff meeting when he was traveling or such.  He told me:  “Marc expects everyone to know the numbers, so before you go in there, make sure you know them.”  And I did.  On the few times I attended in his place, I made a cheat sheet and studied it for an hour to ensure that I knew every possible number that could reasonably be asked.  I’d sit in the meeting, saying little, and listening to discussion not directly related to our area.  Then, boom, out of left field, Marc asked:  “what is the Service Cloud pipeline coverage ratio for this quarter in Europe?”

“3.4,” I replied succinctly.  If I hadn’t have known the number I’m sure it would been an exercise in plucking the wings off a butterfly.  But I did, so the conversation quickly shifted to another topic, and I lived to fight another day.

Frankly, I was happy to work in an organization where executives were expected to know — in their heads, in an instant — the values of the key metrics that drive their business.  I weak organizations you constantly hear “can I get back to you on that” or “I’m going to need to look that one up.”

If you want to run a business, or a piece of one,  and you want to be a credible leader — especially in a metrics-driven organization — you need to have “in-memory” the key metrics that your higher-ups and peers would expect you to know.

This is as true of CEO pitching a venture capitalist and being asked about CAC ratios and churn rates as it is of a marketing VP being asked about keywords, costs, and conversions in an online advertising program.  Or a sales manager being asked about their forecast.

In fact, as I’ve told my sales directors a time or two:  “I should be able to wake you up at 3:00 AM and ask your forecast, upside, and pipeline and you should be able to answer, right then, instantly.”

That’s an in-memory metric.  No “let me check on that.”  No “I’ll get back to you.”  No “I don’t know, let me ask my ops guy,” which always makes me think: who runs the department, you or the ops guy — and if you need to ask the ops guy all the numbers maybe he/she should be running the department and not you?

I have bolded the word “expect” four times above because this issue is indeed about expectations and expectations are not a precise science.  So, how can you figure out the expectations for which analytics you should hold in-memory?

  • Look at your department’s strategic goals and determine which metrics best measure progress on them.
  • Ask peers inside the company what key metrics they keep in-memory and design your set by analogy.
  • Ask peers who perform the same job at different companies what key metrics they track.
  • When in doubt, ask the boss or the higher-ups what metrics they expect you to know.

Finally, I should note that I’m not a big believer in the whole “cheat sheet” approach I described above.  Because that was a special situation (covering for the boss), I think the cheat sheet was smart, but the real way to burn these metrics into your memory is to track them every week at your staff meeting, watching how they change week by week and constantly comparing them to prior periods and to a plan/model if you have one.

The point here is not “fake it until you make it” by running your business in a non-metrics-focused way and memorizing figures before a big meeting, but instead to burn the metrics review into your own weekly team meeting and then, naturally, over time you will know these metrics so instinctively that someone can wake you up at 3:00 AM and you can recite them.

That’s the other kind of in-memory analytics.  And, much as I love technology, the more important kind for your career.

A Fresh Look at How to Measure SaaS Churn Rates

[Editor’s note:  revised 3/27/17 with changes to some definitions.]

It’s been nearly three years since my original post on calculating SaaS renewal rates and I’ve learned a lot and seen a lot of new situations since then.  In this post, I’ll provide a from-scratch overhaul on how to calculate churn in an enterprise SaaS company [1].

While we are going to need to “get dirty” in the detail here, I continue to believe that too many people are too macro and too sloppy in calculating these metrics.  The details matter because these rates compound over time, so the difference between a 10% and 20% churn rate turns into a 100% difference in cohort value after 7 years [2].  Don’t be too busy to figure out how to calculate them properly.

The Leaky Bucket Full of ARR

I conceptualize SaaS companies as leaky buckets full of annual recurring revenue (ARR).  Every time period, the sales organization pours more ARR into the bucket and the customer success (CS) organization tries to prevent water from leaking out [3].

This drives the leaky bucket equation, which I believe should always be the first four lines of any SaaS company’s financial statements:

Starting ARR + new ARR – churn ARR = ending ARR

Here’s an example, where I start with those four lines, and added two extra (one to show a year over year growth rate and another to show “net new ARR” which offsets new vs. churn ARR):

leaky

For more on how to present summary SaaS startup financials, go here.

Half-Full or Half-Empty:  Renewals or Churn?

Since the renewal rate is simply one minus the churn rate, the question is which we should calculate?  In the past, I favored splitting the difference [4], whereas I now believe it’s simpler just to talk about churn.  While this may be the half-empty perspective, it’s more consistent with what most people talk about and is more directly applicable, because a common use of a churn rate is as a discount rate in a net present value (NPV) formula.

Thus, I now define the world in terms of churn and churn rates, as opposed to renewals and renewal rates.

Terminology: Shrinkage and Expansion

For simplicity, I define the following two terms:

  • Shrinkage = anything that makes ARR decrease. For example, if the customer dropped seats or was given a discount in return for signing a multi-year renewal [5].
  • Expansion = anything that makes ARR increase, such as price increases, seat additions, upselling from a bronze to a gold edition, or cross-selling new products.

Key Questions to Consider

The good news is that any churn rate calculation is going to be some numerator over some denominator.  We can then start thinking about each in more detail.

Here are the key questions to consider for the numerator:

  • What should we count? Number of accounts, annual recurring revenue (ARR), or something else like renewal bookings?
  • If we’re counting ARR should we think at the product-level or account-level?
  • To what extent should we offset shrinkage with expansion in calculating churn ARR? [6]
  • When should we count what? What about early and late renewals?  What about along-the-way expansion?  What about churn notices or non-payment?

Here are the key questions to consider for the denominator:

  • Should we use the entire ARR pool, that portion of the ARR pool that is available to renew (ATR) in any given time period, or something else?
  • If using the ATR pool, for any given renewing contract, should we use its original value or its current value (e.g., if there has been upsell along the way)?

What Should We Count?  Logos and ARR

I believe the two metrics we should count in churn rates are

  • Logos (i.e., number of customers). This provides a gross indication of customer satisfaction [7] unweighted by ARR, so you can answer the question:  what percent of our customer base is turning over?
  • This provides a very important indication on the value of our SaaS annuity.  What is happening to our ARR pool?

I would stay completely away from any SaaS metrics based on bookings (e.g., a bookings CAC, TCV, or bookings-based renewals rate).  These run counter to the point of SaaS unit economics.

Gross and Net Shrinkage; Account-Level Churn

Let’s look at a quick example to demonstrate how I now define gross and net shrinkage as well as account-level churn [8].

gross and net shrinkage

Gross shrinkage is the sum of all the shrinkage. In the example, 80 units.

Net shrinkage is the sum of the shrinkage minus the sum of the expansion. In the example, 80-70 = 10 units.

To calculate account-level churn, we proceed, account by account, and look at the change in contract value, separating upsell from the churn.  The idea is that while it’s OK to offset shrinkage with expansion within an account that we should not do so across accounts when working at the account level [9].  This has the effect of splitting expansion into offset (used to offset shrinkage within an account) and upsell (leftover expansion after all account-level shrinkage has been offset).  In the example, account-level churn is 30 units.

Make the important note here that how we calculate you churn – and specifically how we use expansion ARR to offset shrinkage—not only affects our churn rates, but our reported upsell rates as well.  Should we proudly claim 70 units of upsell (and less proudly 80 units of churn), 30 units of churn and 20 of upsell, or simply 10 units of churn?  I vote for the second.

While working at the account-level may seem odd, it is how most SaaS companies work operationally.  First, because they charter customer success managers (CSMs) to think at the account level, working account by account doing everything they can to preserve and/or increase the value of the account.  Second, because most systems work at and finance people think at the account level – e.g., “we had a customer worth 100 units last year, and they are worth 110 units this year so that means upsell of 10 units.  I don’t care how much is price increase vs. swapping some of product A for product B.” [11]

So, when a SaaS company reports “churn ARR,” in its leaky bucket analysis, I believe they should report neither gross churn nor net churn, but account-level churn ARR.

Timing Issues and the Available to Renew (ATR) Concept

Churn calculations bring some interesting challenges such as early/late renewals, churn notices, non-payment, and along-the-way expansion.

A renewals booking should always be taken in the period in which it is received.  If a contract expires on 6/30 and the renewal is received in on 6/15 it should show up in 2Q and if received on 7/15 it should up in 3Q.

For churn rate calculations, however, the customer success team needs to forecast what is going to happen for a late renewal.  For example, if we have a board meeting on 7/12 and a $150K ARR renewal due 6/30 has not yet been happened, we need to proceed based on what the customer has said.  If the customer is actively using the software, the CFO has promised a renewal but is tied up on a European vacation, I would mark the numbers “preliminary” and count the contract as renewed.  If, however, the customer has not used the software in months and will not return our phone calls, I would count the contract as churned.

Suppose we receive a churn notice on 5/1 for a contract that renews on 6/30.  When should we count the churn?  A Bessemer SaaS fanatic would point to their definition of committed monthly recurring revenue (CMRR) [12] and say we should remove the contact from the MRR base on 5/1.  While I agree with Bessemer’s views in general — and specifically on things like on preferring ARR/MRR to ACV and TCV — I get off the bus on the whole notion of “committed” ARR/MRR and the ensuing need to remove the contract on 5/1.  Why?

  • In point of fact the customer has licensed and paid for the service through 6/30.
  • The company will recognize revenue through 6/30 and it’s much easier to do so correctly when the ARR is still in the ARR base.
  • Operationally, it’s defeatist. I don’t want our company to give up and say “it’s over, take them out of the ARR base.” I want our reaction to be, “so they think they don’t want to renew – we’ve got 60 days to change their mind and keep them in.” [13]

We should use the churn notice (and, for that matter, every other communication with the customer) as a way of improving our quarterly churn forecast, but we should not count churn until the contract period has ended, the customer has not renewed, and the customer has maintained their intent not to renew in coming weeks.

Non-payment, while hopefully infrequent, is another tricky issue.  What do we do if a customer gives us a renewal order on 6/30, payable in 30 days, but hasn’t paid after 120?  While the idealist in me wants to match the churn ARR to the period in which the contract was available to renew, I would probably just show it as churn in the period in which we gave up hope on the receivable.

Expansion Along the Way (ATW)

Non-payment starts to introduce the idea of timing mismatches between ARR-changing events and renewals cohorts.  Let’s consider a hopefully more frequent case:  ARR expansion along the way (ATW).  Consider this example.

ATW expansion

To decide how to handle this, let’s think operationally, both about how our finance team works and, more importantly, about how we want our customer success managers (CSMs) to think.  Remember we want CSMs to each own a set of customers, we want them to not only protect the ARR of each customer but to expand it over time.  If we credit along-the-way upsell in our rate calculations at renewal time, we shooting ourselves in the foot.  Look at customer Charlie.  He started out with 100 units and bought 20 more in 4Q15, so as we approach renewal time, Charlie actually has 120 units available to renew (ATR), not 100 [14].  We want our CSMs basing their success on the 120, not the 100.  So the simple rule is to base everything not on the original cohort but on the available to renew (ATR) entering the period.

This begs two questions:

  • When do we count the along-the-way upsell bookings?
  • How can we reflect those 40 units in some sort of rate?

The answer to the first question is, as your finance team will invariably conclude, to count them as they happen (e.g., in 4Q15 in the above example).

The answer to the second question is to use a retention rate, not a churn rate.  Retention rates are cohort-based, so to calculate the net retention rate for the 2Q15 cohort, we divide its present value of 535 by its original value of 500 and get 107%.

Never, ever calculate a retention rate in reverse – i.e., starting a group of current customers and looking backwards at their ARR one year ago.  You will produce a survivor biased answer which, stunningly, I have seen some public companies publish.  Always run cohort analyses forwards to eliminate survivor bias.

Off-Cycle Activity

Finally, we need to consider how to address off-cycle (or extra-cohort) activity in calculating churn and related rates.  Let’s do this by using a big picture example that includes everything we’ve discussed thus far, plus off-cycle activity from two customers who are not in the 2Q16 ATR cohort:  (1) Foxtrot, who purchased in 3Q14, renewed in 3Q15, and who has not paid, and (2) George, who purchased in 3Q15, who is not yet up for renewal, but who purchased 50 units of upsell in 2Q16.

big picture

Foxtrot should count as churn in 2Q16, the period in which we either lost hope of collection (or our collections policy dictated that collection we needed to de-book the deal). [15]

George should count as expansion in 2Q16, the period in which the expansion booking was taken.

The trick is that neither Foxtrot nor George is on a 2Q renewal cycle, so neither is included in the 2Q16 ATR cohort.  I believe the correct way to handle this is:

  • Both should be factored into gross, net, account-level churn, and upsell.
  • For rates where we include them in the numerator, for consistency’s sake we must also include them in the denominator. That means putting the shrinkage in the numerator and adding the ATR of a shrinking (or lost) account in denominator of a rate calculation.  I’ll call this the “+” concept, and define ATR+ as inclusive of such additional logos or ARR resulting from off-cycle accounts [16].

Rate Calculations

We are now in the position to define and calculate the churn rates that I use and track:

  • Simple churn rate = net shrinkage / starting period ARR * 4.  Or, in English, the net change in ARR from existing customers divided by starting period ARR (multiplied by 4 to annualize the rate which is measured against the entire ARR base). As the name implies, this is the simplest churn rate to calculate. This rate will be negative whenever expansion is greater than shrinkage. Starting period ARR includes both ATR and non-ATR contracts (including potentially multi-year contracts) so this rate takes into account the positive effects of the non-cancellability of multi-year deals.  Because it takes literally everything into account, I think this is the best rate for valuing the annuity of your ARR base.
  • Logo churn rate = number of discontinuing logos / number of ATR+ logos. This rate tells us the percent of customers who, given the chance, chose to discontinue doing business with us.  As such, it provides an ARR-unweighted churn rate, providing the best sense of “how happy” our customers are, knowing that there is a somewhat loose correlation between happiness and renewal [16].  Remember that ATR+ means to include any discontinuing off-cycle logos, so the calculation is 1/16 = 6.3% in our example.
  • Retention rate = current ARR [time cohort] / time-ago ARR [time cohort]. In English, the current ARR from some time-based cohort (e.g., 2Q15) divided by the year-ago ARR from that same cohort.  Typically we do this for the one-year-ago or two-years-ago cohorts, but many companies track each quarter’s new customers as a cohort which they measure over time.  Like simple churn, this is a great macro metric that values the ARR annuity, all in.
  • Gross churn rate = gross shrinkage / ATR+. This churn rate is important because it reveals the difference between companies that have high shrinkage offset by high expansion and companies which simply have low shrinkage.  Gross churn is a great metric because it simply shows the glass half-empty view:  at what rate is ARR leaking out of your bucket before offset it with refills in the form of expansion ARR.
  • Account-level churn rate = account-level churn / ATR+. This churn rate foots to the reported churn ARR in our leaky bucket analysis (which uses account-level churn), partially offsets shrinkage with expansion at an account-level, and is how most SaaS companies actually calculate churn.  While perhaps counter-intuitive, it reflects a philosophy of examining, at an account basis, what happens to value of our each of our customers when we allow shrinkage to be offset by expansion (which is what we want our CSM reps doing) leaving any excess as upsell.  This should be our primary churn metric.
  • Net churn rate = net shrinkage / ATR+.  This churn rate offsets shrinkage with expansion not at the account level, but overall.  This is similar to the simple churn rate but with the disadvantage of looking only at ATR and not factoring in the positive effects of non-cancellability of multi-year deals.    Ergo, I prefer using the simple churn rate to the net churn rate in valuing the SaaS annuity.

# # #

Notes

[1] Replacing these posts in the process.

[2] The 10% churn group decays from 100 units to 53 in value after 7 years, while the 20% group decays to 26.

[3] We’ll sidestep the question of who is responsible for installed-based expansion in this post because companies answer it differently (e.g., sales, customer success, account management) and the good news is we don’t need to know who gets credited for expansion to calculate churn rates.

[4] Discussing churn in dollars and renewals in rates.

[5] For example, if a customer signed a one-year contract for 100 units and then was offered a 5% discount to sign a three-year renewal, you would generate 5 units of ARR churn.

[6] Or, as I said in a prior post, should I net first or sum first?

[7] And yes, sometimes unhappy customers do renew (e.g., if they’ve been too busy to replace you) and happy customers don’t (e.g., if they get a new key executive with different preferences) but counting logos still gives you a nice overall indication.

[8] Note that I have capitulated to the norm of saying “gross” churn means before offset and thus “net” churn means after netting out shrinkage and expansion.  (Beware confusion as this is the opposite of my prior position where I defined “net” to mean “net of expansion,” i.e., what I’d now call “gross.”)

[9] Otherwise, you can just look at net shrinkage which offsets all shrinkage by all expansion.  The idea of account-level churn is to restrict the ability to offset shrinkage with expansion across accounts, in effect, telling your customer success reps that their job is to, contract by contract, minimize shrinkage and ensure expansion.

[10] “Offset” meaning ARR used to offset shrinkage that ends up neither churn nor upsell.

[11] While this approach works fine for most (inherently single-product) SaaS startups it does not work as well for large multi-product SaaS vendors where the failure of product A might be totally or partially masked by the success of product B.  (In our example, I deliberately had all the shrinkage coming from downsell of product A to make that point.  The product or general manager for product A should own the churn number that product and be trying to find out why it churned 80 units.)

[12] MRR = monthly recurring revenue = 1/12th of ARR.  Because enterprise SaaS companies typically run on an annual business rhythm, I prefer ARR to MRR.

[13] Worse yet, if I churn them out on 5/1 and do succeed in changing their mind, I might need to recognize it as “new ARR” on 6/30, which would also be wrong.

[14] The more popular way of handling this would have been to try and extend the original contract and co-terminate with the upsell in 4Q16, but that doesn’t affect the underlying logic, so let’s just pretend we tried that and it didn’t work for the customer.

[15] Whether you call it a de-booking or bad receivable, Foxtrot was in the ARR base and needs to come out.  Unlike the case where the customer has paid for the period but is not using the software (where we should churn it at the end of the contract), in this case the 3Q15 renewal was effectively invalid and we need to remove Foxtrot from the ARR base at some defined number of days past due (e.g., 90) or when we lose hope of collection (e.g., bankruptcy).

[16] I think the smaller you are the more important this correction is to ensure the quality of your numbers.  As a company gets bigger, I’d just drop the “+” concept whenever it’s only changing things by a rounding error.

[17] Use NPS surveys for another, more precise, way of measuring happiness.  See [7] as well.

The Opportunity Cost of Debating Facts

I read this New York Times editorial this morning, How the Truth Got Hacked, and it reminded me of a situation at work, back when I first joined Host Analytics some four years ago.  This line, in particular, caught my attention:

Imagine the conversation we’d be having if we weren’t debating facts.

Back when I joined Host Analytics, we had an unfortunate but not terribly unusual dysfunction between product management (PM) and Engineering (ENG).  By the time the conflict got to my office, it went something like this:

PM:  “ENG said they’d deliver X, Y, and Z in the next release and now they’re only delivering X and half of Y.  I can’t believe this and what am I going to the customers and analysts who I told that we were delivering …”

ENG:  “PM is always asking us to deliver too much and we never actually committed to deliver all of Y and we certainly didn’t commit to deliver Z.”

(For extra fun, compound this somewhat normal level of dysfunction with American vs. Indian communication style differences –including a quite subtle way of saying “no” – and you’ll see the real picture.)

I quickly found myself in a series of “he said, she said” meetings that were completely unproductive.  “We don’t write down commitments because we’re agile,” was one refrain.  In fact, while I agree that the words “commitment” and “agile” generally don’t belong in the same sentence, we were anything but agile at the time, so I viewed the statement more as a convenient excuse than an expression of true ideological conflict.

But the thing that bugged me the most was that we had endless meetings where we couldn’t even agree on basic facts.  After all, we either had a planning problem, a delivery problem, or both and unless we could establish what we’d actually agreed to deliver, we couldn’t determine where to focus our efforts.  The meetings were a waste of time.  I had no way knowing who said what to whom, we didn’t have great tracking systems, and I had no interest in email forensics to try and figure it out.  Worse yet, it seemed that two people could leave the same meeting not even agreeing on what was decided.

Imagine the conversation we’d be having if we weren’t debating facts.

In the end, it was clear that we needed to overhaul the whole process, but that would take time.  The question was, in the short term, could we do something that would end the unproductive meetings so we take basic facts in evidence and then have a productive debate at the next level?  You know, to try and make some progress on solving our problems?

I created a document called the Release Scorecard and Commitments document that contained two tables, each structured like this.

release-scorecard

At the start of each release, we’d list the major stories that we were trying to include and we’d have Engineering score their confidence in delivering each one of them.  Then, at the end of every release, PM would score how the delivery went, and the team could provide a comment.  Thus, at every post-release roadmap review, we could review how we did on the prior release and agree on priorities for the next one.  Most importantly, when it came to reviewing the prior release, we had a baseline off which we could have productive discussions about what did or did not happen during the cycle.

Suddenly, by taking the basic facts out of question, the meetings changed overnight.  First, they became productive.  Then, after we fully transitioned to agile, they became unnecessary.  In fact, I’ve since repeatedly said that I don’t need the document anymore because it was a band-aid artifact of our pre-agile world.  Nevertheless, the team still likes producing it for the simple clarity it provides in assessing how we do at laying out priorities and then delivering against them.

So, if you find yourself in a series of unproductive, “he said, she said” meetings, learn this lesson:  do something to get basic facts into evidence so you can have a meaningful conversation at the next level.

Because there is a massive opportunity cost when all you do is debate what should be facts.