Category Archives: Uncategorized

Tomorrow’s Product Power Breakfast with Paul Jozefak on Introducing SaaS as a Layer to Lighten the Legacy Load

Please join us for tomorrow’s SaaS Product Power Breakfast with entrepreneur and venture capitalist Paul Jozefak, CEO of Receeve (an all-in-one platform for collections and recovery), on how to use SaaS as a layer atop legacy systems to prove return on investment (ROI) and smooth the customer’s transition before setting out to rip and replace them.

This is an interesting strategy that I’ve seen numerous times in SaaS and it cuts to core product strategy issues, most notably, to what extent and in what timeframe do you “design in” versus “design out” the underlying technology.

In addition to both impromptu and (hopefully some) audience questions, we’ll be asking Paul:

  • Why layer on top in your target segment?
  • Are there any risks to layering?
  • What are your customers trying to accomplish when it comes to working with Receeve?
  • Where is technology in the segment headed?
  • What hurdles do you hit with decision makers?

Thomas has not been feeling well so, while he’s slated to be our lead interviewer tomorrow, I may end up taking the lead on this episode.

Either way, see you there!

Chatting About Marketing: Slides from a PE Portfolio Company CEO Summit

The good people of Riverside Acceleration Capital and my old friend Jon Temple invited me to speak at their portfolio company CEO Summit and I was only too happy to oblige, particularly because Jon asked me to speak about one of my favorite topics — marketing in early- and growth-stage enterprise SaaS companies.

In particular, Jon asked me to speak about 7 topics:

  • How to think about marketing
  • Professionalizing marketing
  • Scaling marketing
  • Managing the sales/marketing relationship
  • Planning & budgeting marketing
  • The age-old people vs. programs debate
  • Success metrics and KPIs for marketing

I’ve embedded the slides from the presentation below.

Thanks again for inviting me and thanks as well to my fellow presenters, Aki Balogh from MarketMuse and Garin Hess from Consensus.

Video of My SaaStr 2020 Presentation: Churn is Dead, Long Live Net Dollar Retention

Thanks to everyone who attended my SaaStr 2020 presentation and thanks to those who provided me with great feedback and questions on the content of the session.  The slides from the presentation are available here.  The purpose of this post is to share the video of the session, courtesy of the folks at SaaStr.  Enjoy!

 

Churn is Dead, Long Live Net Dollar Retention! Slides from my SaaStr 2020 Presentation

I just finished delivering my presentation at SaaStr Annual 2020, dubbed Churn Is Dead, Long Live Net Dollar Retention.  The presentation is about understanding SaaS businesses:  how to think about them, how to value them, how to use unit economics like CAC and churn to measure them, all with a particular focus on measuring the health of the annuity portion of a SaaS business, the installed base.

While the session is title is perhaps dramatized, if churn isn’t dead I think it’s at least wounded because there are too many ways to calculate it — and the downstream metrics based on it.  That, in turn, lends itself to gaming.  As I said in the presentation:  “there’s a reason PE firms recalculate all your metrics!”

While I generally think public company SaaS metrics are inferior to private company ones, I think the public company way of measuring churn/retention — i.e., net dollar retention (NDR) rate — is superior to LTV/CAC and similar metrics, and thus that private companies should start tracking NDR, too.

If NDR is going to be measured, it can be managed and I suggest both a good and a bad way to think about that.  I wrap up with a quick introduction to RPO (remaining performance obligation), another public company SaaS metric that I believe should and will catch on with private SaaS companies.

Appearance on the CFO Bookshelf Podcast with Mark Gandy

Just a quick post to highlight a recent interview I did on the CFO Bookshelf podcast with Mark Gandy.  The podcast episode, entitled Dave Kellogg Address The Rule of 40, EPM, SaaS Metrics and More, reflects the fun and somewhat wandering romp we had through a bunch of interesting topics.

Among other things, we talked about:

  • Why marketing is a great perch from which to become a CEO
  • Some reasons CEOs might not want to blog (and the dangers of so doing)
  • A discussion of the EPM market today
  • A discussion of BI and visualization, particularly as it relates to EPM
  • The Rule of 40 and small businesses
  • Some of my favorite SaaS operating metrics
  • My thoughts on NPS (net promoter score)
  • Why I like driver-based modeling (and what it has in common with prime factorization)
  • Why I still believe in the “CFO as business partner” trope

You can find the episode here on the web, here on Apple Podcasts, and here on Google Podcasts.

Mark was a great host, and thanks for having me.