Tag Archives: winning

Using “Win Themes” to Improve Your Sales Management and Increase Win Rates

At most sales review meetings what do you hear sales management asking the reps?  Questions like these:

  • What stage is this opportunity in?
  • What value do you have it at in the pipeline?
  • Is there upside to that value?
  • What forecast category is it in?
  • In what quarter will it close?
  • What competitors are in the deal?
  • What products will they be buying?
  • Do they have budget for the purchase?
  • How do we meet their primary requirements for a solution?
  • How have we demonstrated that we can meet those requirements?
  • What are the impacts of not solving those problems?
  • How did they attempt to solve those problems before?
  • Who is impacted by the consequences of those impacts?
  • Who is the primary decision maker?
  • What is the decision-making process?
  • Who else is involved in the decision and in what roles?
  • Who have you developed relationships with in the account?
  • What risk is there of a goal-post move?

And on and on.

Some of these questions are about systems and process.  Some are about forecasting.  Ideally, most are about the problem the customer is trying to solve, the impacts of not solving it, how they tried to solve it before, the ideal solution to the problem, and the benefits of solving it.  But in our collective hurry to be process-oriented, methodology-driven, systems-compliant, and solutions-oriented, all too often something critical gets lost:

Why are we going to win?

What?  Oh shoot.  Yep, forgot to ask that one.  And, of course, that’s the most important one.  As I sometimes need to remind sales managers, while the process is great, let’s not forget the purpose of the process is to win.

(I’ve even met a few sales managers so wedded to process and discipline that I’ve wondered if they’d rather crash while flying in perfect formation than win flying out of it.)

Process is great.  I love process.  But let’s not forget the point.  How can we do that?  With win themes — two to three simple, short, plain-English reasons why you are going to win the deal.  Here’s an example.  We are going to win because:

  • Joe the CFO saw first-hand how Adaptive didn’t scale in his last job and is committed to purchasing a system he can grow with.
  • Our partner, CFO Experts, has worked with Joe in the past, has a great relationship with him, and firmly believes that Host is the best fit with the requirements.

Build win themes into your systems and process.  Don’t add win themes to the bottom of your Salesforce opportunity screen; put them right up top so the first conversation about any deal — before you dive into the rabbit hole — is “why are we going to win?”   Two to three win themes should provide a proposed answer and a healthy platform for strategic discussion.

(And, as my friend Kate pointed out, in case it didn’t come up in the win theme conversation, don’t forget to ask “why might we lose?”)

Win Them Alone, Lose Them Together

It was back in the 1990s, at Versant, when my old (and dearly departed) friend Larry Pulkownik first introduced me to the phrase:

Win Them Alone, Lose Them Together

And its corollary:

Ask for Help at the First Sign of Trouble

Larry told me this rule from the sales perspective:

“Look, if you’re working on a deal and it starts to go south, you need to get everyone involved in working on it.  First, that puts maximum resources on winning the deal and if — despite that effort — you end up losing, you want people saying ‘We lost the Acme deal,’ not ‘You lost the Acme deal.'”

It’s a great rule.  Why?  Because it’s simple, it engages the team on winning, and most of all — it combats what seems to be a natural tendency to hide bad news.  Bad news, like sushi, does not age well.

Twenty years later, and now as CEO, I still love the rule — especially the part about “the first sign of trouble.”  If followed, this eliminates the tendency to go into denial about bad news.

  • Yes, they’re not calling me back when they said they would, but I’m sure it’s no problem.
  • They did say they expected to be in legal now on the original timeline, but I’m sure the process is just delayed.
  • Yes, I know our sponsor seemed to have flipped on us in the last meeting, but I’m sure she was just having a bad day.
  • Well I’m surprised to hear our competitor just met with the CIO because they told us that the CIO wasn’t involved in the decision.
  • While the RFP does appear to have been written by our competitor, that’s probably just coincidence.

These things — all of them — are bad news.  Because many people’s first reaction to bad news is denial, the great thing about the “first sign” rule is that you remove discretion from the equation. We don’t want you to wait until you are sure there is trouble — then it’s probably too late.  We want you to ask for help at the first sign.

The rule doesn’t just apply to sales.  The same principle applies to pretty much everything:

  • Strategic partnerships (e.g., “they’ve gone quiet”)
  • Analyst relations (e.g., “it feels like the agenda is set for enemy A”)
  • Product development (e.g., “I’m worried we’ve badly over-scoped this”)
  • Financing (e.g., “they’re not calling back after the partner meeting”)
  • Recruiting (e.g., “the top candidate seemed to be leaning back”)
  • HR (e.g., “our top salesperson hated the new comp plan”)

I’ll always thank Larry for sharing this nugget of wisdom (and many others) with me, and I’ll always advise every manager I know to follow it.