Category Archives: FPA

The New Gartner 2018 Magic Quadrants for Cloud Financial Planning & Analysis and Cloud Financial Close Solutions

If all you’re looking for is the free download link, let’s cut to the chase:  here’s where you can download the new 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Financial Planning and Analysis Solutions and the new 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Cloud Financial Close Solutions.  These MQs are written jointly by John Van Decker and Chris Iervolino (with Chris as primary author on the first and John as primary author on the second).  Both are deep experts in the category with decades of experience.

Overall, I can say that at Host Analytics, we are honored to a leader in both MQs again this year.  We are also honored to be the only cloud pure-play vendor to be a leader in both MQs and we believe that speaks volumes about the depth and breadth of EPM functionality that we bring to the cloud.

So, if all you wanted was the links, thanks for visiting.  If, however, you’re looking for some Kellblog editorial on these MQs, then please continue on.

Whither CPM?
The first thing the astute reader will notice is that the category name, which Gartner formerly referred to as corporate performance management (CPM), and which others often referred to as enterprise performance management (EPM), is entirely missing from these MQs.  That’s no accident.  Gartner decided last fall to move away from CPM as a uber category descriptor in favor of referring more directly to the two related, but pretty different, categories beneath it.  Thus, in the future you won’t be hearing “CPM” from Gartner anymore, though I know that some vendors — including Host Analytics — will continue to use EPM/CPM until we can find a more suitable capstone name for the category.

Personally, I’m in favor of this move for two simple reasons.

  • CPM was a forced, analyst-driven category in the first place, dating back to Howard Dresner’s predictions that financial planning/budgeting would converge with business intelligence.  While Howard published the research that launched a thousand ships in terms of BI and financial planning industry consolidation (e.g., Cognos/Adaytum, BusinessObjects/SRC/Cartesis, Hyperion/Brio), the actual software itself never converged.  CPM never became like CRM — a true convergence of sales force automation (SFA) and contact center.  In each case, the two companies could be put under one roof, but they sold fundamentally different value propositions to very different buyers and thus never came together as one.
  • In accordance with the prior point, few customers actually refer to the category by CPM/EPM.  They say things much more akin to “financial planning” and “consolidation and close management.”  Since I like referring to things in the words that customers use, I am again in favor of this change.

It does, however, create one problem — Gartner has basically punted on trying to name a capstone category to include vendors who sell both financial planning and financial consolidation software.  Since we at Host Analytics think that’s important, and since we believe there are key advantages to buying both from the same vendor, we’d prefer if there were a single, standard capstone term.  If it were easy, I suppose a name would have already emerged [1].

How Not To Use Magic Quadrants
While they are Gartner’s flagship deliverable, magic quadrants (MQs) can generate a lot of confusion.  MQs don’t tell you which vendor is “best” because there is no universal best in any category.  MQs don’t tell you which vendor to pick to solve your problem because different solutions are designed around meeting different requirements.  MQs don’t predict the future of vendors — last-year’s movement vectors rarely predict this year’s positions.  And the folks I know at Gartner generally strongly dislike vector analysis of MQs because they view vendor placement as relative to each other at any moment in time [2].

Many things that customers seem to want from Gartner MQs are actually delivered by Gartner’s Critical Capabilities reports which get less attention because they don’t produce a simple, dramatic 2×2 output, but which are far better suited for determine the suitability of different products to different use-cases.

How To Use A Gartner Magic Quadrant?
In my experience after 25+ in enterprise software, I would use MQs for their overall purpose:  to group vendors into 4 different bucketsleaders, challengers, visionaries, and niche players.  That’s it.  If you want to know who the leaders are in a category, look top right.  If you want to know who the visionaries are, look bottom right.  You want to know which big companies are putting resources into the category but who thus far are lacking strategy/vision, then look top-left at the challengers quadrant.

But should you, in my humble opinion, get particularly excited about millimeter differences on either axes?  No.  Why?  Because what drives those deltas may have little, none, or in fact a counter-correlation to your situation.  In my experience, the analysts pay a lot of attention to the quadrants in which vendors end up in [2] so quadrant-placement, I’d say, is quite closely watched by the analysts.  Dot-placement, while closely watched by vendors, save for dramatic differences, doesn’t change much in the real world.  After all, they are called the magic quadrants, not the magic dots.

All that said, let me wind up with some observations on the MQs themselves.

Quick Thoughts on the 2018 Cloud FP&A Solutions MQ
While the MQs were published at the end of July 2018, they were based on information about the vendors gathered in and largely about 2017.  While there is always some phase-lag between the end of data collection and the publication data, this year it was rather unusually long — meaning that a lot may have changed in the market in the first half of 2018 that customers should be aware of. For that reason, if you’re a Gartner customer and using either the MQs or critical capabilities reports that accompany them, you should probably setup an appointment to call the analysts to ensure you’re working off the latest data.

Here are some of my quick thoughts the Cloud FP&A Solutions magic quadrant:

  • Gartner says the FP&A market is accelerating its shift from on-premises cloud.  I agree.
  • Gartner allows three types of “cloud” vendors into this (and the other) MQ:  cloud-only vendors, on-premise vendors with new built-for-the-cloud solutions, and on-premises vendors who allow their software to be run hosted on a third-party cloud platform.  While I understand their need to be inclusive, I think this is pretty broad — the total cost of ownership, cash flows, and incentives are quite different between pure cloud vendors and hosted on-premises solutions.  Caveat emptor.
  • To qualify for the MQ vendors must support at least two of the four following components of FP&A:  planning/budgeting, integrated financial planning, forecasting/modeling, management/performance reporting.  Thus the MQ is not terribly homogeneous in terms of vendor profile and use-cases.
  • For the second year in a row, (1) Host is a leader in this MQ and (2) is the only cloud pure-play vendor who is a leader in both.  We think this says a lot about the breadth and depth of our product line.
  • Customer references for Host cited ease of use, price, and solution flexibility as top three purchasing criteria.  We think this very much represents our philosophy of complex EPM made easy.

Quick Thoughts on the 2018 Cloud Financial Close Solutions MQ
Here are some of my quick thoughts on the Cloud Financial Close Solutions magic quadrant:

  • Gartner says that in the past two years the financial close market has shifted from mature on-premises to cloud solutions.  I agree.
  • While Gartner again allowed all three types of cloud vendors in this MQ, I believe some of the vendors in this MQ do just-enough, just-cloud-enough business to clear the bar, but are fundamentally still offering on-premise wolves in cloud sheep’s clothing.  Customers should look to things like total cost of ownership, upgrade frequency, and upgrade phase lags in order to flesh out real vs. fake cloud offerings.
  • This MQ is more of a mixed bag than the FP&A MQ or, for that matter, most Gartner MQs.  In general, MQs plot substitutes against each other — each dot on an MQ usually represents a vendor who does basically the same thing.  This is not true for the Cloud Financial Close (CFC) MQ — e.g., Workiva is a disclosure management vendor (and a partner of Host Analytics).  However, they do not offer financial consolidation software, as does say Host Analytics or Oracle.
  • Because the scope of this MQ is broad and both general and specialist vendors are included, customers should either call the Gartner for help (if they are Gartner customers) or just be mindful of the mixing and segmentation — e.g., Floqast (in SMB and MM) and Blackline (in enterprise) both do account reconciliation, but they are naturally segmented by customer size (and both are partners of Host, which does financial consolidation but not account reconciliation).
  • Net:  while I love that the analysts are willing to put different types of close-related, office-of-the-CFO-oriented vendors on the same MQ, it does require more than the usual amount of mindfulness in interpreting it.

Conclusion
Finally, if you want to analyze the source documents yourself, you can use the following link to download both the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Financial Planning and Analysis and Consolidation and Close Management.

# # #

Notes

[1] For Gartner, this is likely more than a semantic issue.  They are pretty strong believers in a “post-modern” ERP vision which eschews the idea of a monolithic application that includes all services, in favor of using and integrating a series of cloud-based services.  Since we are also huge believers in integrating best-of-breed cloud services, it’s hard for us to take too much issue with that.  So we’ll simply have to clearly articulate the advantages of using Host Planning and Host Consolidations together — from our viewpoint, two best-of-breed cloud services that happen to come from a single vendor.

[2] And not something done against absolute scales where you can track movement over time.  See, for example, the two explicit disclaimers in the FP&A MQ:

Capture

[3] I’m also a believer in a slightly more esoteric theory which says:  given that the Gartner dot-placement algorithm seems to try very hard to layout dots in a 45-degree-tilted football shaped pattern, it is always interesting to examine who, how, and why someone ends up outside that football.

The New Gartner 2018 Magic Quadrants for Cloud Financial Planning & Analysis and Cloud Financial Close Solutions

If all you’re looking for is the free download link, let’s cut to the chase:  here’s where you can download the new 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Financial Planning and Analysis Solutions and the new 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Cloud Financial Close Solutions.  These MQs are written jointly by John Van Decker and Chris Iervolino (with Chris as primary author on the first and John as primary author on the second).  Both are deep experts in the category with decades of experience.
Overall, I can say that at Host Analytics, we are honored to a leader in both MQs again this year.  We are also honored to be the only cloud pure-play vendor to be a leader in both MQs and we believe that speaks volumes about the depth and breadth of EPM functionality that we bring to the cloud.
So, if all you wanted was the links, thanks for visiting.  If, however, you’re looking for some Kellblog editorial on these MQs, then please continue on.
Whither CPM?
The first thing the astute reader will notice is that the category name, which Gartner formerly referred to as corporate performance management (CPM), and which others often referred to as enterprise performance management (EPM), is entirely missing from these MQs.  That’s no accident.  Gartner decided last fall to move away from CPM as a uber category descriptor in favor of referring more directly to the two related, but pretty different, categories beneath it.  Thus, in the future you won’t be hearing “CPM” from Gartner anymore, though I know that some vendors — including Host Analytics — will continue to use EPM/CPM until we can find a more suitable capstone name for the category.
Personally, I’m in favor of this move for two simple reasons.

  • CPM was a forced, analyst-driven category in the first place, dating back to Howard Dresner’s predictions that financial planning/budgeting would converge with business intelligence.  While Howard published the research that launched a thousand ships in terms of BI and financial planning industry consolidation (e.g., Cognos/Adaytum, BusinessObjects/SRC/Cartesis, Hyperion/Brio), the actual software itself never converged.  CPM never became like CRM — a true convergence of sales force automation (SFA) and contact center.  In each case, the two companies could be put under one roof, but they sold fundamentally different value propositions to very different buyers and thus never came together as one.
  • In accordance with the prior point, few customers actually refer to the category by CPM/EPM.  They say things much more akin to “financial planning” and “consolidation and close management.”  Since I like referring to things in the words that customers use, I am again in favor of this change.

It does, however, create one problem — Gartner has basically punted on trying to name a capstone category to include vendors who sell both financial planning and financial consolidation software.  Since we at Host Analytics think that’s important, and since we believe there are key advantages to buying both from the same vendor, we’d prefer if there were a single, standard capstone term.  If it were easy, I suppose a name would have already emerged [1].
How Not To Use Magic Quadrants
While they are Gartner’s flagship deliverable, magic quadrants (MQs) can generate a lot of confusion.  MQs don’t tell you which vendor is “best” because there is no universal best in any category.  MQs don’t tell you which vendor to pick to solve your problem because different solutions are designed around meeting different requirements.  MQs don’t predict the future of vendors — last-year’s movement vectors rarely predict this year’s positions.  And the folks I know at Gartner generally strongly dislike vector analysis of MQs because they view vendor placement as relative to each other at any moment in time [2].
Many things that customers seem to want from Gartner MQs are actually delivered by Gartner’s Critical Capabilities reports which get less attention because they don’t produce a simple, dramatic 2×2 output, but which are far better suited for determine the suitability of different products to different use-cases.
How To Use A Gartner Magic Quadrant?
In my experience after 25+ in enterprise software, I would use MQs for their overall purpose:  to group vendors into 4 different bucketsleaders, challengers, visionaries, and niche players.  That’s it.  If you want to know who the leaders are in a category, look top right.  If you want to know who the visionaries are, look bottom right.  You want to know which big companies are putting resources into the category but who thus far are lacking strategy/vision, then look top-left at the challengers quadrant.
But should you, in my humble opinion, get particularly excited about millimeter differences on either axes?  No.  Why?  Because what drives those deltas may have little, none, or in fact a counter-correlation to your situation.  In my experience, the analysts pay a lot of attention to the quadrants in which vendors end up in [2] so quadrant-placement, I’d say, is quite closely watched by the analysts.  Dot-placement, while closely watched by vendors, save for dramatic differences, doesn’t change much in the real world.  After all, they are called the magic quadrants, not the magic dots.
All that said, let me wind up with some observations on the MQs themselves.
Quick Thoughts on the 2018 Cloud FP&A Solutions MQ
While the MQs were published at the end of July 2018, they were based on information about the vendors gathered in and largely about 2017.  While there is always some phase-lag between the end of data collection and the publication data, this year it was rather unusually long — meaning that a lot may have changed in the market in the first half of 2018 that customers should be aware of. For that reason, if you’re a Gartner customer and using either the MQs or critical capabilities reports that accompany them, you should probably setup an appointment to call the analysts to ensure you’re working off the latest data.
Here are some of my quick thoughts the Cloud FP&A Solutions magic quadrant:

  • Gartner says the FP&A market is accelerating its shift from on-premises cloud.  I agree.
  • Gartner allows three types of “cloud” vendors into this (and the other) MQ:  cloud-only vendors, on-premise vendors with new built-for-the-cloud solutions, and on-premises vendors who allow their software to be run hosted on a third-party cloud platform.  While I understand their need to be inclusive, I think this is pretty broad — the total cost of ownership, cash flows, and incentives are quite different between pure cloud vendors and hosted on-premises solutions.  Caveat emptor.
  • To qualify for the MQ vendors must support at least two of the four following components of FP&A:  planning/budgeting, integrated financial planning, forecasting/modeling, management/performance reporting.  Thus the MQ is not terribly homogeneous in terms of vendor profile and use-cases.
  • For the second year in a row, (1) Host is a leader in this MQ and (2) is the only cloud pure-play vendor who is a leader in both.  We think this says a lot about the breadth and depth of our product line.
  • Customer references for Host cited ease of use, price, and solution flexibility as top three purchasing criteria.  We think this very much represents our philosophy of complex EPM made easy.

Quick Thoughts on the 2018 Cloud Financial Close Solutions MQ
Here are some of my quick thoughts on the Cloud Financial Close Solutions magic quadrant:

  • Gartner says that in the past two years the financial close market has shifted from mature on-premises to cloud solutions.  I agree.
  • While Gartner again allowed all three types of cloud vendors in this MQ, I believe some of the vendors in this MQ do just-enough, just-cloud-enough business to clear the bar, but are fundamentally still offering on-premise wolves in cloud sheep’s clothing.  Customers should look to things like total cost of ownership, upgrade frequency, and upgrade phase lags in order to flesh out real vs. fake cloud offerings.
  • This MQ is more of a mixed bag than the FP&A MQ or, for that matter, most Gartner MQs.  In general, MQs plot substitutes against each other — each dot on an MQ usually represents a vendor who does basically the same thing.  This is not true for the Cloud Financial Close (CFC) MQ — e.g., Workiva is a disclosure management vendor (and a partner of Host Analytics).  However, they do not offer financial consolidation software, as does say Host Analytics or Oracle.
  • Because the scope of this MQ is broad and both general and specialist vendors are included, customers should either call the Gartner for help (if they are Gartner customers) or just be mindful of the mixing and segmentation — e.g., Floqast (in SMB and MM) and Blackline (in enterprise) both do account reconciliation, but they are naturally segmented by customer size (and both are partners of Host, which does financial consolidation but not account reconciliation).
  • Net:  while I love that the analysts are willing to put different types of close-related, office-of-the-CFO-oriented vendors on the same MQ, it does require more than the usual amount of mindfulness in interpreting it.

Conclusion
Finally, if you want to analyze the source documents yourself, you can use the following link to download both the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Financial Planning and Analysis and Consolidation and Close Management.

# # #

Notes
[1] For Gartner, this is likely more than a semantic issue.  They are pretty strong believers in a “post-modern” ERP vision which eschews the idea of a monolithic application that includes all services, in favor of using and integrating a series of cloud-based services.  Since we are also huge believers in integrating best-of-breed cloud services, it’s hard for us to take too much issue with that.  So we’ll simply have to clearly articulate the advantages of using Host Planning and Host Consolidations together — from our viewpoint, two best-of-breed cloud services that happen to come from a single vendor.
[2] And not something done against absolute scales where you can track movement over time.  See, for example, the two explicit disclaimers in the FP&A MQ:
Capture
[3] I’m also a believer in a slightly more esoteric theory which says:  given that the Gartner dot-placement algorithm seems to try very hard to layout dots in a 45-degree-tilted football shaped pattern, it is always interesting to examine who, how, and why someone ends up outside that football.

Putting the A Back in FP&A with Automated, Integrated Planning

I was reading this blog post on Continuous Planning by Rob Kugel of Ventana Research the other day and it reminded me of one of my (and Rob’s) favorite sayings:

We need to put the A back in FP&A

This means that the financial planning and analysis (FP&A) team at many companies is so busy doing other things that it doesn’t have time to focus on what it does best and where it can add the most value:  analysis.

This begs the question:  where did the A go?  What are the other things that are taking up so much time?  The answer:  data prep and spreadsheet jockeying.  These functions suck time away and the soul from the FP&A function.

dataprep

Data-related tasks — such as finding, integrating, and preparing data — take up more than 2/3rds of FP&A’s time.  Put differently, FP&A spends twice as much time getting ready to analyze data than it does analyzing it.  It might even be worse, depending on whether periodic and ad hoc reporting is included in data-related task or further carved out of the 28% of time remaining for analytics, as I suspect it is.

spreadsheetsrule

It’s not just finance who loves spreadsheets.  The business does do:  salesops, marketingops, supply chain planners, professional services ops, and customer support all love spreadsheets, too.  When I worked at Salesforce, we had one of the most sophisticated sales strategy and planning teams I’ve ever seen.  Their tool of choice?  Excel.

This comes back to haunt finance in three ways:

  • Warring models, for example, when the salesops new bookings model doesn’t foot to the finance one because they make different ramping and turnover assumptions.  These waste time with potential endless fights.
  • Non-integrated models.  Say sales and finance finally agree on a bookings target and to hire 5 more salespeople to support it.  Now we need to call marketing to update their leadgen model to ensure there’s enough budget to support them, customer service to ensure we’re staffed to handle the incremental customers they sign, professional services to ensure we’re have adequate consulting resources, and on and on.  Forget any of these steps and you’ll start the year out of balance, with unattainable targets somewhere.
  • Excel inundation.   FP&A develops battle fatigue dealing with and integrating some many different versions of so many spreadsheets, often late and night and under deadline pressure.  Mistakes gets made.

So how can prevent FP&A from being run over by these forces?  The answer is to automate, automate, and integrate.

  • Automate data integration and preparation.  Let’s free up time by use software that lets you “set and forget” data refreshes.  You should be able to setup a connector to a data source one, and then have it automatically run at periodic intervals going forward.  No more mailing spreadsheets around.
  • Automate periodic FP&A tasks.  Use software where you can invest in building the perfect monthly board pack, monthly management reports, quarterly ops review decks, and quarterly board reports once, and then automatically refresh it every period through these templates.  This not only free up time and reduces drudgery; it eliminates plenty of mistakes as well.
  • Integrate planning across the organization.  Move to a cloud-based enterprise performance platform (like Host Analytics) that not only accomplishes the prior two goals, but also offers a modeling platform that can be used across the organization to put finance, salesops, marketingops, professional services, supply chain, HR, and everyone else across the organization on a common footing.

Since the obligatory groundwork in FP&A is always heavy, you’re not going to succeed in putting the A back in FP&A simply by working harder and later.  The only way to put the A back in FP&A is to create time.  And you can do that with two doses of automation and one of integration.

Putting the A Back in FP&A with Automated, Integrated Planning

I was reading this blog post on Continuous Planning by Rob Kugel of Ventana Research the other day and it reminded me of one of my (and Rob’s) favorite sayings:

We need to put the A back in FP&A

This means that the financial planning and analysis (FP&A) team at many companies is so busy doing other things that it doesn’t have time to focus on what it does best and where it can add the most value:  analysis.
This begs the question:  where did the A go?  What are the other things that are taking up so much time?  The answer:  data prep and spreadsheet jockeying.  These functions suck time away and the soul from the FP&A function.
dataprep
Data-related tasks — such as finding, integrating, and preparing data — take up more than 2/3rds of FP&A’s time.  Put differently, FP&A spends twice as much time getting ready to analyze data than it does analyzing it.  It might even be worse, depending on whether periodic and ad hoc reporting is included in data-related task or further carved out of the 28% of time remaining for analytics, as I suspect it is.
spreadsheetsrule
It’s not just finance who loves spreadsheets.  The business does do:  salesops, marketingops, supply chain planners, professional services ops, and customer support all love spreadsheets, too.  When I worked at Salesforce, we had one of the most sophisticated sales strategy and planning teams I’ve ever seen.  Their tool of choice?  Excel.
This comes back to haunt finance in three ways:

  • Warring models, for example, when the salesops new bookings model doesn’t foot to the finance one because they make different ramping and turnover assumptions.  These waste time with potential endless fights.
  • Non-integrated models.  Say sales and finance finally agree on a bookings target and to hire 5 more salespeople to support it.  Now we need to call marketing to update their leadgen model to ensure there’s enough budget to support them, customer service to ensure we’re staffed to handle the incremental customers they sign, professional services to ensure we’re have adequate consulting resources, and on and on.  Forget any of these steps and you’ll start the year out of balance, with unattainable targets somewhere.
  • Excel inundation.   FP&A develops battle fatigue dealing with and integrating some many different versions of so many spreadsheets, often late and night and under deadline pressure.  Mistakes gets made.

So how can prevent FP&A from being run over by these forces?  The answer is to automate, automate, and integrate.

  • Automate data integration and preparation.  Let’s free up time by use software that lets you “set and forget” data refreshes.  You should be able to setup a connector to a data source one, and then have it automatically run at periodic intervals going forward.  No more mailing spreadsheets around.
  • Automate periodic FP&A tasks.  Use software where you can invest in building the perfect monthly board pack, monthly management reports, quarterly ops review decks, and quarterly board reports once, and then automatically refresh it every period through these templates.  This not only free up time and reduces drudgery; it eliminates plenty of mistakes as well.
  • Integrate planning across the organization.  Move to a cloud-based enterprise performance platform (like Host Analytics) that not only accomplishes the prior two goals, but also offers a modeling platform that can be used across the organization to put finance, salesops, marketingops, professional services, supply chain, HR, and everyone else across the organization on a common footing.

Since the obligatory groundwork in FP&A is always heavy, you’re not going to succeed in putting the A back in FP&A simply by working harder and later.  The only way to put the A back in FP&A is to create time.  And you can do that with two doses of automation and one of integration.

The Strategy Compiler: How To Avoid the “Great” Strategy You Couldn’t Execute

Few phrases bother me more than this one:

“I know it didn’t work, but it was a great strategy.  We just didn’t have the resources to execute it.”

Huh.  Wait minute.  If you didn’t have the resources to execute it, then it wasn’t a great strategy.  Maybe it was a great strategy for some other company that could have applied the appropriate resources.  But it wasn’t a great strategy for you.  Ergo, it wasn’t a great strategy.  QED.

I learned my favorite definition of strategy at a Stanford executive program I attended a few years back.  Per Professor Robert Burgelman, author of Strategy is Destiny, strategy is simply “the plan to win.”  Which begets an important conversation about the definition of winning.  In my experience, defining winning is more important than making the plan, because if everyone is focused on taking different hills, any resultant strategy will be a mishmash of plans to support different objectives.

But, regardless of your company’s definition of winning, I can say that any strategy you can’t execute definitionally won’t succeed and is ergo a bad strategy.

It sounds obvious, but nevertheless a lot of companies fall into this trap.  Why?

  • A lack of focus.
  • A failure to “compile” strategy before executing it.

Focus:  Think Small to Grow Big

Big companies that compete in lots of broad markets almost invariably didn’t start out that way.

BusinessObjects started out focused on the Oracle financials installed base.  Facebook started out on Harvard students, then Ivy league students.  Amazon, it’s almost hard to remember at this point, started out in books.  Salesforce started out in SMB salesforce automation.  ServiceNow on IT ticket management.  This list goes on and on.

Despite the evidence and despite the fame Geoffrey Moore earned with Crossing the Chasm, focus just doesn’t come naturally to people.  The “if I could get 1% share of a $10B market, I’d be a $100M company” thought pattern is just far too common. (And investors often accidentally reinforce this.)

The fact is you will be more dominant, harder to dislodge, and probably more profitable if, as a $100M company, you control 30% of a $300M target as opposed to 1% of a $10B target.

So the first reason startups make strategies they can’t execute is because they forget to focus.  They aim too broadly. They sign up for too much.  The forget that strategy should be sequence of actions over time.  Let’s start with Harvard. Then go Ivy League.  Then go Universities in general.  Then go everyone.

Former big company executives often compound the problem.  They’re not used to working with scarce resources and are more accustomed to making “laundry list” strategies that check all the boxes than making focused strategies that achieve victory step by step.

A Failure to Compile Strategy Before Execution

The second reason companies make strategies they can’t execute is that they forget a critical step in the planning process that I call the strategy compiler.  Here’s what I think a good strategic planning process looks like.

  • Strategy offsite. The executive team spends a week offsite focused on situation assessment and strategy.  The output of this meeting should be (1) a list of strategic goals for the company for the following year and (2) a high-level financial model that concretizes what the team is trying to accomplish over the next three years.  (With an eye, at a startup, towards cash.)

 

  • First round budgeting. Finance issues top-down financial targets.  Executives who own the various objectives make strategic plans for how to attain them.  The output of this phase is (1) first-draft consolidated financials, (2) a set of written strategies along with proposed organizational structures and budgets for attaining each of the company’s ten strategic objectives.

 

  • Strategy compilation, resources. The team meets for a day to review the consolidated plans and financials. Invariably there are too many objectives, too much operating expense, and too many new hires. The right answer here is to start cutting strategic goals.  The wrong answer is to keep the original set of goals and slash the budget 20% across the board.  It’s better to do 100% of 8 strategic initiatives than do 80% of 10.

 

  • Strategy compilation, skills. The more subtle assessment that must happen is a sanity check on skills and talent.  Do your organization have the competencies and do your people have the skills to execute the strategic plans?  If a new engineering project requires the skills of 5 founder-level, Stanford computer science PHDs who each would want 5% of a company, you are simply not going to be able to hire that kind of talent as regular employees. (This is one reason companies do “acquihires”).  The output of this phase is a presumably-reduced set of strategic goals.

 

  • Second round budgeting. Executives to build new or revised plans to support the now-reduced set of strategic goals.

 

  • Strategy compilation. You run the strategy compiler again on the revised plan — and iterate until the strategic goals match the resources and the skills of the proposed organization.

 

  • Board socialization. As you start converging via the strategy compiler you need to start working with the board to socialize and eventually sell the proposed operating plan.  (This process could easily be the subject of another post.)

 

If you view strategy as the plan to win, then successful strategies include only those strategies that your organization can realistically execute from both a resources and skills perspective.  Instead of doing a single-pass process that moves from strategic objectives to budgets, use an iterative approach with a strategy compiler to ensure your strategic code compiles before you try to execute it.

If you do this, you’ll increase your odds of success and decrease the odds ending up in the crowded section of the corporate graveyard where the epitaphs all read:

Here Lies a Company that Had a “Great” Strategy  It Had No Chance of Executing

The Strategy Compiler: How To Avoid the "Great" Strategy You Couldn't Execute

Few phrases bother me more than this one:

“I know it didn’t work, but it was a great strategy.  We just didn’t have the resources to execute it.”

Huh.  Wait minute.  If you didn’t have the resources to execute it, then it wasn’t a great strategy.  Maybe it was a great strategy for some other company that could have applied the appropriate resources.  But it wasn’t a great strategy for you.  Ergo, it wasn’t a great strategy.  QED.
I learned my favorite definition of strategy at a Stanford executive program I attended a few years back.  Per Professor Robert Burgelman, author of Strategy is Destiny, strategy is simply “the plan to win.”  Which begets an important conversation about the definition of winning.  In my experience, defining winning is more important than making the plan, because if everyone is focused on taking different hills, any resultant strategy will be a mishmash of plans to support different objectives.
But, regardless of your company’s definition of winning, I can say that any strategy you can’t execute definitionally won’t succeed and is ergo a bad strategy.
It sounds obvious, but nevertheless a lot of companies fall into this trap.  Why?

  • A lack of focus.
  • A failure to “compile” strategy before executing it.

Focus:  Think Small to Grow Big

Big companies that compete in lots of broad markets almost invariably didn’t start out that way.
BusinessObjects started out focused on the Oracle financials installed base.  Facebook started out on Harvard students, then Ivy league students.  Amazon, it’s almost hard to remember at this point, started out in books.  Salesforce started out in SMB salesforce automation.  ServiceNow on IT ticket management.  This list goes on and on.
Despite the evidence and despite the fame Geoffrey Moore earned with Crossing the Chasm, focus just doesn’t come naturally to people.  The “if I could get 1% share of a $10B market, I’d be a $100M company” thought pattern is just far too common. (And investors often accidentally reinforce this.)
The fact is you will be more dominant, harder to dislodge, and probably more profitable if, as a $100M company, you control 30% of a $300M target as opposed to 1% of a $10B target.
So the first reason startups make strategies they can’t execute is because they forget to focus.  They aim too broadly. They sign up for too much.  The forget that strategy should be sequence of actions over time.  Let’s start with Harvard. Then go Ivy League.  Then go Universities in general.  Then go everyone.
Former big company executives often compound the problem.  They’re not used to working with scarce resources and are more accustomed to making “laundry list” strategies that check all the boxes than making focused strategies that achieve victory step by step.

A Failure to Compile Strategy Before Execution

The second reason companies make strategies they can’t execute is that they forget a critical step in the planning process that I call the strategy compiler.  Here’s what I think a good strategic planning process looks like.

  • Strategy offsite. The executive team spends a week offsite focused on situation assessment and strategy.  The output of this meeting should be (1) a list of strategic goals for the company for the following year and (2) a high-level financial model that concretizes what the team is trying to accomplish over the next three years.  (With an eye, at a startup, towards cash.)

 

  • First round budgeting. Finance issues top-down financial targets.  Executives who own the various objectives make strategic plans for how to attain them.  The output of this phase is (1) first-draft consolidated financials, (2) a set of written strategies along with proposed organizational structures and budgets for attaining each of the company’s ten strategic objectives.

 

  • Strategy compilation, resources. The team meets for a day to review the consolidated plans and financials. Invariably there are too many objectives, too much operating expense, and too many new hires. The right answer here is to start cutting strategic goals.  The wrong answer is to keep the original set of goals and slash the budget 20% across the board.  It’s better to do 100% of 8 strategic initiatives than do 80% of 10.

 

  • Strategy compilation, skills. The more subtle assessment that must happen is a sanity check on skills and talent.  Do your organization have the competencies and do your people have the skills to execute the strategic plans?  If a new engineering project requires the skills of 5 founder-level, Stanford computer science PHDs who each would want 5% of a company, you are simply not going to be able to hire that kind of talent as regular employees. (This is one reason companies do “acquihires”).  The output of this phase is a presumably-reduced set of strategic goals.

 

  • Second round budgeting. Executives to build new or revised plans to support the now-reduced set of strategic goals.

 

  • Strategy compilation. You run the strategy compiler again on the revised plan — and iterate until the strategic goals match the resources and the skills of the proposed organization.

 

  • Board socialization. As you start converging via the strategy compiler you need to start working with the board to socialize and eventually sell the proposed operating plan.  (This process could easily be the subject of another post.)

 
If you view strategy as the plan to win, then successful strategies include only those strategies that your organization can realistically execute from both a resources and skills perspective.  Instead of doing a single-pass process that moves from strategic objectives to budgets, use an iterative approach with a strategy compiler to ensure your strategic code compiles before you try to execute it.
If you do this, you’ll increase your odds of success and decrease the odds ending up in the crowded section of the corporate graveyard where the epitaphs all read:

Here Lies a Company that Had a “Great” Strategy  It Had No Chance of Executing

Host Analytics World 2016 EPM Keynote Address

We’re just finishing up a fantastic Host Analytics World 2016, with over 800 people gathered together in San Francisco to talk about enterprise performance management (EPM).   Here are a few pictures to give you a feel for the event.

Here’s 49ers football legend Steve Young delivering his keynote address:

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Here’s me delivering my keynote on EPM in fair weather and foul.

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Here’s an artsy shot of someone taking a picture during my keynote.

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And, of course, here are our mascots, Tick and Tie, stuffing bags for Project Night Night, the philanthropic activity we had at the conference cosponsored by Host Analytics and our amazing customer, Thrivent Financial.

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The conference has been superb and I want to thank everyone — customers, prospective customers, analysts, journalists, pundits, and partners — for being a part of this great event.

I find it amazing that at such a great time to be in the cloud EPM market that we have competitors more focused on business intelligence (BI), predictive analytics, and functional performance management than on core EPM itself.  At Host Analytics, we know who we want to be:  the best vendor in cloud EPM, serving the fat middle 80% of the market.  More importantly, perhaps, we know who we don’t want to be:  we don’t want to be a visual analytics vendor, a social collaboration vendor, or a sales performance management vendor — hence our partnerships with Qlik, Socialcast, and Xactly.

We serve finance, we speak finance, and we’re proud of that.  Oh, and yes, our customers, finance leaders, care about the whole enterprise so we offer not only solutions to automate core finance processes but also tools to model the entire enterprise and align finance and operations.

You can hear about this and other topics by watching the 75 minute keynote speech and demo, embedded below.

 

Finally, please remember to save the date for Host Analytics World 2017 — May 16 through 19, 2017.

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